Posts

Playing with FIRe: Dr. Teehankee highlights responsible business and management research in the era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

The Fourth Industrial Revolution, consisting of many promising emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, to name a few, has also brought a different level of complexity to the world today. One of which is the conduct of business and management research in the era of the FIR.

During a plenary session in the 6th National Business and Management Conference, De La Salle University Full Professor Dr. Benito Teehankee highlights responsible business and management research in the era of the FIR.

The FIR is a confluence of emerging technologies such as the Internet of Things, big data, blockchain, artificial intelligence, and robotics, among many others. Klaus Schwab, the founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum, emphasizes that “the Fourth Industrial Revolution will affect the very existence of our human experience”.

Following this fast-paced development, Dr. Teehankee elucidates that a “responsibility turn” or shift in the conduct of business and management research must take place. In a position paper titled “A vision for responsible research in business and management: Striving for useful and credible knowledge”, Dr. Teehankee shares several challenges that need to be addressed, as well as the solutions and current initiatives taking place.

To move forward, Dr. Teehankee suggests prioritizing research that enable business practice to be a positive agent for human and social development and look at how benefits from the FIR can be optimized and its potential harms mitigated. Promoting a critical and ethical view towards big data and business analytics are also suggested by Dr. Teehankee.

DLSU VCRI discusses research trends in the digital economy during 6NBMC

The digital economy is already here, and it’s a matter of tapping and maximizing its potential. During the 6th National Business and Management Conference, De La Salle University Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation Dr. Raymond Girard Tan delivered a keynote address on research trends in the digital economy and what this development means for multiple sectors particularly the academe.

Among those discussed by Dr. Tan include the current landscape of the digital economy, research and innovations as drivers for growth, and its implications to higher education in business.

The digital economy

Dr. Tan highlights that technology firms are now a dominant global force. With the likes of Facebook, Google, Adobe, and Twitter, among many others, these firms are leading the growth of the digital economy. “Technological innovations will change the global business landscape”, he adds.

One of the most cited business articles of the decade entitled “Business intelligence and analytics: From big data to big impact” further implies the rapid pace by which the digital economy will trailblaze in the coming years.

Dr. Tan states one part of the article: “Business intelligence and analytics (BI&A) has emerged as an important area of study for both practitioners and researchers, reflecting the magnitude and impact of data-related problems to be solved in contemporary business organizations”.

In the Philippines, information technology, business process management, and e-commerce were identified as one of the top 12 priority areas by the Department of Trade and Industry. This signifies the Philippine government’s focus on taking advantage of the opportunities brought by the digital economy.

Research and innovation

According to the 2018 Global Innovation Index, the Philippines ranks 73rd. The country was further ranked as follows: 86th in human capital and research, 44th in business sophistication, and 49th in knowledge and technology outputs.

Considering this development, Dr. Tan emphasizes the need to establish interdependencies between the government, researchers, industry, and general public to maximize the innovation opportunities. According to him, among the tools that will be required to implement these interdependencies include research and development support, policy-making, and goods and services, to name a few.

In the country, the Department of Science and Technology has developed the “Harmonized National Research and Development Agenda” for 2017 to 2022 that indicates the government’s support for technology-based innovations. The agenda also emphasizes emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and data analytics, and focuses on knowledge transfer, commercialization, and utilization in the technology industry.

Implications on the academe

Given these developments in the digital economy, Dr. Tan enumerates three main functions of the academe: transmitting knowledge, creating knowledge, and acting as a public knowledge resource. He furthers that one of the ways to do this is through extensive research and innovation.

Dr. Tan lists down several benefits with undergoing research in the academe: contribute knowledge as a societal good, provide solutions to complex issues, enrich the national talent pool, and enhance the university’s international reputation.

Moreover, these developments have further implications to individual faculty members in the Philippine academia. For instance, a shift in career identity from teacher to a teacher and researcher must be embraced by current faculty members. Moreover, developing a global mindset, career planning and time management, and shaping institutional processes and cultures are also important considerations.

“Business schools need to strengthen research to empower students and faculty to succeed in the digital economy”, Dr. Tan concludes.

BanKo president highlights financial inclusion, SEMEs during 6NBMC talk

Financial inclusion for the unbanked and underserved”—this is the highlight of BPI Direct BanKo Inc., A Savings Bank President Mr. Jerome Minglana’s keynote address during the 6th National Business and Management Conference

Mr. Minglana talked about the products and services of BPI Direct BanKo, Inc., which offers mostly financial solutions to the unbanked and underserved. It brings with it the “goal of bringing the benefits of financial inclusion to many Filipinos”.

According to data by the World Bank Global Findex 2014 in the Philippines, there were over 50.2 million Filipinos in 2016 who were “unbanked”. Mr. Minglana emphasizes how access to credit and savings and payment solutions are among the initiatives that can help address this challenge.

Moreover, Mr. Minglana explains the massive size of the micro, small, and medium enterprises in the country, comprising of over 99.57% of all businesses. Of this percentage, 89.63% are microenterprises—these are the enterprises that BPI Direct BanKo, Inc. is focusing on. Specifically, the company targets self-employed microentrepreneurs (SEME) coming from four main industries: wholesale and retail trading, manual services, food services, and agricultural livestock.

As of October 2018, the company has now over 150 branches. Its end goal is to be able to support SEMEs financially in term of credit, savings, payment, remittance, and protection.

DLSU CBRD, PAoM hold 6NBMC

The DLSU Center for Business Research and Development (CBRD), in partnership with the Philippine Academy of Management (PAoM), held the 6th National Business and Management Conference (6NBMC) last November 9 to 10 at DLSU – Manila.

The theme for the 6NBMC is “Sparking a digital economy: The use of technology in business and management for innovation, inclusivity, and integration”. Its main goal is to discuss and assess recent developments in technology and how this impacts the conduct of business and management.

Apart from the digital economy, other themes and areas were also included in the conference such as social entrepreneurship, new business models, resilience building in disaster-vulnerable environments, and sustainable tourism. These are conducted through plenary sessions with industry practitioners and the academe, research parallel sessions, capability building sessions, and round table discussions.

Among the distinguished speakers during the keynote address and plenary sessions include DLSU Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation Dr. Raymond Girard Tan, BPI Direct BanKo Inc. President Mr. Jerome Minglana, DLSU Full Professor Dr. Benito Teehankee, Hungry Workhorse President Mr. Reynaldo Lugtu Jr., and Grab Philippines Country Marketing Head Ms. Cindy Toh.

On the other hand, among the professors who conducted the capability building sessions include Associate Professor Dr. Gerardo Largoza for “Experimental Design for Business Research” and Asia-Pacific Social Science Review Editor Dr. Romeo Lee for “Effective Work Habits in Research and Publishing”.

Now on its sixth year, the NBMC serves as a platform for faculty members and graduate students of Philippine business schools to engage in scholarly research and undergo a presentation and critique of their ideas. It also attempts to establish linkages and networks so as to spur collaboration in different areas such as humanistic management, social entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial leadership, and disaster resilience, to name a few.

CBRD, BDS conduct sharing session on case study research

The DLSU Center for Business Research and Development (CBRD) and Business Doctoral Society (BDS) held a sharing session on case study research by Ms. Bianca Villar on November 20, 2018. Villar presented her dissertation titled “Architecting purpose-driven improvisation towards organizational effectiveness in extreme environments: Case narratives from organizations during Typhoon Haiyan”.

The dissertation positions itself within the scholarly conversations on organizing processes in disaster environments. In particular, the main research inquiry is ‘how does the interaction of individual and collective level attributes among improvised actions of the organizations explain how they can realize their goals, i.e. be effective, in extreme contexts?’. Using a case strategy approach, it surfaces narratives of two profiles of organizations that were critical to the response and recovery phase of the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan.

Bianca Villar is a PhD Candidate and an EU Marie Curie Fellow in the Group of Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Technology Management (GREITM) at La Salle – Universitat Ramon Llull in Barcelona, Spain. Her current research lies at the intersection of organization studies and disaster science, where she is primarily interested in exploring organizing processes in disaster environments.

The sharing session was attended by doctoral students of DLSU and by faculty members from Holy Angel University and the Asia Pacific College.

CBRD director delivers professorial chair lecture on PRESENT Bill

DLSU Center for Business Research and Development (CBRD) Director Dr. Raymund Habaradas delivered his professorial chair lecture titled “What is absent in the PRESENT Bill? Why cash is not necessarily the answer to scaling social enterprises in the Philippines” on August 24, 2018 at the DLSU Faculty Center. Habaradas is the holder of the Doña Engracia Reyes Chair in Service Oriented Entrepreneurship.

During his lecture, Habaradas talked about the factors that contribute to the scaling of social enterprises in the Philippines, which he derived from several case studies he and his co-researchers have conducted under CBRD’s Social Enterprise Research Network (CBRD-SERN). According to him, organizational factors that contribute to successful scaling include business acumen, collaborative network, innovative product / service, and innovative business model; while the environmental factors are ecology of support, and competitive / market pressures.

Drawing insights from the experiences of local social enterprises, Habaradas identified possible improvements on Senate Bill No. 176, also known as the Poverty Reduction through Social Entrepreneurship (PRESENT) Act, which aims to support the growth of social enterprises in the Philippines. Sponsored by Senator Bam Aquino, the bill is being supported by the PRESENT Coalition, an alliance of various social entrepreneurs and advocates, which include academia and civil society. Mr. Gomer Padong, Development Cooperation and Advocacy Director of the Philippine Social Enterprise Network (PHILSEN), served as reactor.

The PRESENT Bill

While the PRESENT Bill addresses some important points such as the need to get social enterprises integrated in the value chain, there are some provisions (or the absence of relevant ones) that betray a lack of understanding of the mechanisms that result in the successful scaling of social enterprises or in the scaling of innovative solutions to social problems. Habaradas mentioned that the proposed law provides for the establishment of a social enterprise development fund, and also provides for special credit windows. He wonders, though, what makes these different from the credit facilities already made available by government financial institutions to micro-, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs), and which are not fully availed of anyway.

He also questioned the enforceability of certain provisions, such as the encouragement of local government units to collaborate with social enterprises, and the call for DepEd, TESDA, and CHED to “cause the integration of SE content and inclusion of SE courses in the curricula at all levels, especially at the secondary and tertiary levels.” He said that a more concrete mechanism must be in place to enforce these provisions.

To improve the PRESENT Bill, Habaradas recommended the following: (1) including provisions that will build cultural and social capital, rather than focusing on economic capital; (2) providing support to organizations that provide the platform for social enterprise development; (3) establishing mechanisms for effective cross-sector partnerships, (4) involving local government units in identifying problem areas with ‘neglected positive externalities’, and (5) removing certain provisions of the bill that are not enforceable.

Padong’s reaction

Padong said that the PRESENT Bill is continuously evolving, and that revisions are still welcome at this point. Since the initial draft of the bill was formulated in 2012 by 47 social entrepreneurship practitioners, it underwent eight changes mainly due to transitions from one leader to another. Padong cites that the PRESENT Bill is different compared to legislation introduced in other countries in the sense that social entrepreneurship in the Philippines mostly focus on poverty reduction. This distinction, he adds, is what makes social enterprises in the Philippines unique. “We have a different framing of social enterprises here in the Philippines because a big portion of our population is poor,” he said.

One of the ways by which the PRESENT Bill can undergo further improvements is through a more thorough collaboration with the academe. Due to its dynamic nature, the social enterprise sector entails a more dynamic collaboration among the different sectors involved in the legislation process.

Habaradas’ lecture was organized by CBRD-SERN in collaboration with the Management and Organization Department.

IHMA, Fordham University, De La Salle University launch Humanistic Management Book Award

The International Humanistic Management Association (IHMA), in collaboration with Fordham University and De La Salle University’s Center for Business Research and Development – Business for Human Development Network, opens nominations for the Humanistic Management Book Award for scholarly contributions in the field of humanistic management.

In order to qualify, the award must “advance thinking on better humanistic management” with regard to the following:

• The protection of dignity (human and all life), i.e. The role of intrinsic value in the organizing process, the role of human dignity within the managerial context, the role of dignity of life in general and its relevance for better organizing practices
• The promotion of well-being (common good), i.e. the role of life-conducive managerial processes to organizational success, the measurement of quality of life outcomes with regard to organizational management, the shifts in mindset/practices/institutions required to achieve flourishing.

The IHMA awards honor contributions that are conceptually rigorous, novel, and / or empirically strong. For the scholarly award, the IHMA values novel conceptual contributions that help build organizing and management theory. The award recognizes impactful writings that can influence organizations and management practice.

For the policy award, the IHMA recognizes work that builds on the foundational ideas of dignity protection and well-being promotion. It also brings forth propositions for policy and eco-system design. The IHMA’s PhD-related awards and recognition classify as scholarly contributions.

Process: Nominations including self-nominations can be submitted  by May 31, 2018.

To nominate and for more info: https://tinyurl.com/ybks6sbr